Journal Entry

Holiday Gift Guide | For a knitter

Grainline Studio | Gift Guide

If you are shopping for a knitter this holiday season we put together this guide of presents that any knitter would love to have and would find useful. Enjoy!

Grainline Studio | Gift Guide

1 | 2

  1.  This Loome Tool is great for making pom- poms to add to hats and all sorts of other objects. I like to put pom- poms on the back of my socks… its like having fun burrs attached to me.

  2.  The Stowe Bag. It’s a very handy project bag that any knitter would appreciate making. It has tons of pockets and is the perfect way to make a knitting project portable.

Grainline Studio | Gift Guide

3 | 4

3. Stitch Markers are a must have for knitters and these markers come in an adorable pouch!

4. These snips have a candy cane theme going on. Perfect for the Holidays!

Grainline Studio | Gift Guide

5 | 6

5. Soak is a knitwear safe wash that smells fantastic. It’s gentle and suitable for your fine hand knit items. You don’t have to rinse it!

6. All knitters have a yarn stash. This basket would be a lovely place for that stash to live.

Leave a comment Posted in Journal Entry
Journal Entry

Holiday Gift Guide | For a garment sewer

Grainline Studio | Gift Guide

It’s time to get cozy with our families, friends and pets and celebrate the holidays!  The season we love for cookies, parties and gift giving! Gift giving can be stressful because if you are like me, and the rest of the crew here you want to give your loved ones something useful and yet meaningful. And so many of us feel like we don’t need more stuff! However, as a crafter, I am always happy to receive something special that helps me make things. We are excited to share a series of gift guides that we created to help you shop for the crafters that you love. This first one is a gift guide for garment sewers. Stay tuned because we will also be posting guides for knitters and quilters.

Grainline Studio | Gift Guide

1 | 2

  1. Our Scout Tee! It’s the perfect gift for a garment sewer because every sewer needs a tee shirt pattern and it’s a project that is not overwhelming to take on. The sewer you know will have it finished by the end of January!
  2. This fashioner sketch book is perfect for planning outfits and future projects. The pages are printed with a dot-line drawing of a female figure for you to sketch garments or outfits on top of. It’s essential for planning outfits and keeping inventory of garments you already own.

Grainline Studio | Gift Guide

3 | 4

3. This bamboo point turner is the perfect tool to really get into those corners and make crisp edges. I use it all the time when I make pockets, pouches and collars. It’s extremely handy and a lovely object.

4. The pen style chaco liner is my absolute favorite tool for tracing around my pattern pieces. It leaves a visible mark that you can brush off when you are done. It also makes a very satisfying sound when the wheel turns. It’s perfect for a stocking stuffer. Grainline Studio | Gift Guide

5 | 6

5. Sometimes it’s nice to get a prettier version of the most basic tool you use all of the time. I love the red caps on the end of these pins… and the box is adorable.

6. People who sew get rough dry hands. Especially  in winter! It’s the time of year to really take care of those digits.

1 Comment Posted in Journal Entry
Farrow Dress

Farrow Sew-Along Schedule

Farrow Sew-Along | Grainline Studio

It’s time to get your fabric and supplies together because the Farrow Sew-Along is almost here! We’ll get started with our first posts Thursday of next week and continue throughout the month of December ending before the holidays. We’ll be breaking it down into small steps you can accomplish after work or easily catch up on over the weekend. We’re so excited to get started!

If you need the pattern, you can grab it here. We’ll have a full supply post similar to this Tamarack supply post up next week.

Farrow Sew-Along Schedule

  1. Gathering your Supplies
  2. Selecting your Size
  3. Pattern Adjustments
  4. Cutting
  5. Assembling the Dress Back
  6. Assembling the Dress Front
  7. Side & Shoulder Seams
  8. View A: Armhole Binding
  9. View B: Sleeves
  10. Neckline Binding
  11. Hems & Finishing

We’ll see you back here next week for the first installment!

3 Comments Posted in Farrow Dress
Tamarack Jacket

Tamarack: Setting Snaps

Tamarack Snaps | Grainline Studio

The last step in your Tamarack jacket is adding the closure. There are a few different options you can use for this. Buttons, sew in snaps, or you can set snaps. We’re going to show you the latter in this tutorial since we’ve gotten a lot of questions about the process. This is the quick and easy method using the tool included with your snaps. There are many other ways to set snaps involving a press and such but this way works great and doesn’t require extra tools.

You can view the snaps, and everything else we used for our jacket, in this Tamarack Supplies post.

Tamarack Snaps | Grainline Studio

Your snaps will come with 4 different snap parts and two tool pieces. The 4 snap parts are on the left of this photo and the tools are on the right.

In the top row you have the snap pieces that will go onto the outer layer of the jacket when the jacket is closed. To the left is the outer piece – the cap – this is the part you see when the jacket is closed. On the right is the piece that attaches to the other side of the fabric. This – the socket – is the female part of the snap.

In the bottom row are the snap pieces that will go onto the lower layer of the jacket when closed. To the left again is the piece that will be facing up and attaches to the right side of the jacket, called the stud. This is also the male part of the snap. To the left is the back of the snap – the post. This holds the male part of the snap on.

The round flat tool is called the anvil and has two sides, a flat one for setting the upper half of the snap, and the side shown above for setting the lower half of the snap. The long tool is a die punch, it’s what you’ll hit with a hammer to secure the two pieces of the snap around the fabric.

Tamarack Snaps | Grainline Studio

You’ll need to decide on your closure placement. We’ve included a guide in the pattern which you can use, but in some cases you might want to come up with your own placement. With this jacket I’ve decided to place the snaps at the top corner of the quilted lines, I think it looks nicer than the way they fall with the placement guide because of the way I quilted this particular jacket.

Tamarack Snaps | Grainline Studio

Once you’ve decide on your snap placement you’ll need to mark it onto the jacket. I use chalk and a ruler to do this, that way if things aren’t quite right you can always brush it away and start over with marking.

Tamarack Snaps | Grainline Studio

You’ll now need to make a small hole in your jacket, just large enough for the snap shank to fit through. You can easily use a scissor to do this, and I know I said “no extra tools!” above, but I do use this small screw punch for this part. This is the tool I also use to mark dart points and other match points on my paper patterns so it’s really a useful tool. It’s actually a book binding tool but I find it absolutely indispensable for my pattern work.

I’ll be demo-ing snap insertion on this small quilted scrap because it’s easier to see what I’m doing than on the large jacket.

Tamarack Snaps | Grainline Studio

With the right side facing up, slip the shank of the cap into the hole you cut.

Tamarack Snaps | Grainline Studio

  1. With the cap shank still in the hole, flip the jacket to the wrong side.
  2. Place the socket over the shank of the cap.
  3. Turn the anvil so that the smooth side is facing up. Place the snap cap into the anvil.
  4. Align the die punch over the socket so that the grooves of the two pieces match. Hammer the top of the punch to secure the snap in place.

Tamarack Snaps | Grainline Studio

The inside of your snap will look like this when properly secured. Now it’s time to move onto the second side.

Tamarack Snaps | Grainline Studio

Transfer the placement of the snaps you just set over to the other side of the coat. Punch holes at the placement markings.

Tamarack Snaps | Grainline Studio

  1. Place the shank of the post through the hole from the wrong side to the right.
  2. Flip the jacket right side up with the shank still through the hole.
  3. Align the stud over the post.
  4. Place the snap into the raised side of the anvil. The shape of the post will align perfectly with the inset in the anvil.
  5. Align the die punch over the stud so that the the grooves of the two pieces match. Hammer the top of the punch to secure the snap in place.

Tamarack Snaps | Grainline Studio

Once set both sides of your snaps will look like the above images.

Tamarack Snaps | Grainline Studio

That’s it to setting snaps. Like welt pockets, they’re kind of intimidating because you’re cutting a hole in your almost finished garment, but as you can see there’s no need to be worried. We do recommend setting one complete snap on a scrap before attacking your jacket, just to get a handle on all the pieces involved.

Hope you found this tutorial useful and enjoyed the Tamarack Sew-Along!

2 Comments Posted in Tamarack Jacket
Tamarack Jacket

Tamarack: Applying Bias Binding

We’ve inserted our welt pockets and now it’s time to bind the main body of the jacket. Here I’ll walk you through that process which includes our technique for turning corners with bias binding. If you’ve ever made a quilt this part will be familiar for you, and if not you’ll be learning something new!

If you’re making your own bias binding you’ll want to start here. If not you can skip down a few steps.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Cut bias strips 2″ wide from the fabric you intend to bind with. We’re using the outer fabric for ours but using the inner or a contrast can be really cute. You can mark your binding out with chalk and cut or use a rotary cutter and ruler as we did above.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

You’re likely going to need a longer strip than you’re able to cut from your fabric so we’ll be sewing pieces together. To do this align your bias strips as shown above.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Stitch across the two strips from the inside of one point to the other.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Press the seam allowance open.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Trim off the triangles of seam allowance that overhang the strip. Repeat this step until you have bias long enough for the edges you’re binding.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Now you’ll need to fold your binding. You can do this by hand by folding the binding in half, then bringing each edge into the center crease and pressing, or by feeding it through a bias tape maker. When using one of these, as shown above, simply thread one end through the maker and place a pin through the end.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

You’ll then move the bias tape maker along the bias strip, pressing with your iron as you go. After you’re done you can fold the tape in half and press so that you have the center crease, personally though I don’t bother since that can change slightly depending on how accurately you attach the tape to the garment.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

To begin we’ll bind the back hem of the coat. Take the back piece and starting about 1″ above the side hem notch align one of the raw edges of the binding with the raw edge of the jacket. Stop the binding about 1″ above the opposing hem notch. Stitch in the fold along the length of the binding.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Flip the binding over the edge to the wrong side of the jacket and press the binding down into place. You can either stitch the binding in place by hand for an invisible finish or turn the jacket right side up and stitch with your machine as shown below.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Once you’re done your back hem will look like this.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Now sew your shoulder seams together according to the instructions in the pattern booklet so that we can continuously bind the front edges of the jacket.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Again start approximately 1″ above the side seam notch aligning the raw edge of the binding to the raw edge of the jacket. Turn the corner and continue towards the front of the jacket. Mark a point 1/2″ in from the front edge of the jacket – that’s where the last pin is above. Sew in the binding fold from the side seam towards the center front stoppping at this point.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Fold the binding down creating an angle from the corner of the jacket in.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Next fold the binding up over top of the fold you just created. You can see the lump of the diaganol fold in the image above. Pin the binding up towards the neckline, again stopping 1/2″ shy of the neck edge.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline StudioTamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Stitch from the lower edge (all the way to the edge) up to the point you marked at the neckline. Work your way around the front of the jacket repeating these steps at each corner until you get to the side hem notch at the opposide side of the jacket. Again stop binding 1″ above the notch.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Once that is completed you’ll want to press the binding away from the jacket. Even though you pressed the fold originally this helps to really make a crisp binding.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

Fold the binding over the edge to the wrong side of the jacket and press into place. Stitch the binding in place using the same method you used for the back hem of the jacket.

Tamarack Bias Binding | Grainline Studio

That’s all there is! Follow the instructions in the pattern booklet to assemble the rest of your jacket. You’ll apply these same techniques to the edges of the sleeve once those are attached and the side seams are sewn. All that’s left is the closures. We’ll be back talking snaps in our next post!

5 Comments Posted in Tamarack Jacket
Tamarack Jacket

Tamarack: Inserting Welt Pockets

Are you ready to insert some welt pockets? This is hands down the most requested Tamarack tutorial; I think a lot of people are a bit scared of welt pockets. Nothing more frightening than cutting a hole through the middle of your garment piece I suppose. Like everything else in sewing though, don’t stress, take things one step at a time, and remember to breathe – you’ll be just fine. Let’s dive in!

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

To begin you’ll need to mark the placement of the welt pockets. I recommend hand basting rather than marking with chalk in this situation because there are so many layers of fabric involved.

Your first line will connect the two pocket placement lines, extend each side 3/4″ beyond the placement marks. Then baste a line the same length both 1/4″ above and 1/4″ below the first line. Finally, at each end of the pocket opening, stitch a line perpendicular to the pocket openings through the pocket placement marks to indicate the width of the pocket. These lines should also extend 3/4″. You want to extend the markings so that you can see your starting and stopping points as you stitch with the pocket pieces attached.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Prep your welts by first fusing your interfacing to the wrong side of the fabric. You will then fold the welts in half lengthwise with the right sides facing and stitch the two ends together. Grade your seam allowance, clip your corners, and turn the welt right side out. Press and baste the opening of the welt closed so that it acts as one piece while attaching it.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Now align the welt pocket along the center line of the pocket markings between the two edges. The welt will be facing towards the bottom of the jacket. Baste the welt in place.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Align the upper pocket with front of the jacket, the right side of the pocket should be facing down. The upper pocket should fall 1/2″ below the lower basted pocket marking and should extend over each side by 1″. Pin your pocket in place.

halliep@amazon.com

Flip your jacket so that the inside is facing up. Starting in the center of either long edge, stitch in a rectangle exactly following the basted markings. Make sure to pivot at exactly the corners. Make sure that the stitching on the short edges falls just to the outside of the welt. Too far away from the welt and you’ll have a gap on either side of your pocket, too close and you won’t be able to flip it to the inside.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Next you need to slice your pocket open. Take extreme care not to cut through your stitching when doing this as that will be a slightly difficult repair. Starting at the center cut out towards each edge stopping 1/2″ away from the end. From this point clip into the corners cutting to, but not through, the stitching. Not clipping far enough can cause puckers, but clipping too far will ruin your pocket. You can always clip further during the next step if you’re worried. Also keep in mind that since we have 2 layers of fabric and 1 layer of batting it will be impossible for the pocket to lay perfectly flat.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Pull the pocket and welt gently through the hole you just cut. Press the pocket piece flat; the welt should be facing up on the outside of the jacket. If your corners are very puckered you can clip slightly further into them.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

The outside of your jacket will look like this.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Now fold your welt back and stitch along the top edge of the pocket opening, approximately 1/8″ from the edge, through the jacket, seam allowance, and upper pocket. This will help anchor everything in place and make for a neater finished pocket.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

To attach the lower pocket, align the lower pocket over the upper pocket so that the edges match as shown above.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Flip the jacket so that the outside is facing up and fold down the bottom of the jacket to reveal the pocket seam allowances. Stitch along the dotted line shown above exactly following the existing stitching line. Make sure not to extend your stitching beyond what was previously stitched.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Now fold the lower pocket down and press.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Fold the upper pocket down so that the sides and lower edge meet. The top edge should cover the seam allowance at the top pocket edge. We’ll stitch that down later to enclose the raw edges.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Flip the jacket so that the inside is facing down and fold the edge in. At the side of the pocket there are these tiny triangles – stitch over them along the existing stitching line just from one edge of the base of the triangle to the other. This will anchor the edge of your pocket.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Stitch along the pocket edge at 1/2″.  Finish your edge as desired. In this sample I’m using bias binding, but you can easily serge or zig zag the edges.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Slipstitch the top edge of the pocket down to just the inside layer of the jacket to enclose the raw edges along the top of the pocket.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Flip your coat over and remove your basting stitches.

Inserting Tamarack Welt Pockets | Grainline Studio

Finally, slipstitch the edges of the welt to the pocket to secure them in place. Repeat these steps for the other side.

And that’s it! You’ve inserted your welt pockets, congrats!

Leave a comment Posted in Tamarack Jacket
News

Last Chance to get thanked

Grainline Studio | Give Thanks

It’s the last day of our annual Give Thanks Sale. Did it creep up you? If so.. you still have until Midnight to get 20% of your purchase!

The details on this years Give Thanks Sale are as follows…
-Sale includes both digital and printed patterns.
-The sale EXCLUDES wholesale orders, gift cards, the Stowe Bag, the Farrow, the Tamarack.
-Enter the code GIVETHANKS16 at checkout for 20% off your purchase.
-You will enter the discount code on the second page of the checkout process along with your payment information.
-The sale ends at midnight CST on Monday November, 28th.

 

Leave a comment Posted in News
News

Give Thanks Pattern Sale

Grainline Studio | Give Thanks

We have a lot to be thankful for this year. Grainline Studio has been growing and changing in so many amazing ways. We have been able to release more patterns then ever and we have a studio beagle for the rest of the year! We really love having yawl follow along. To show our appreciation we are kicking off our annual Give Thanks Sale. The sale begins Thursday, November 24th at 12:01 am CST and ends on November 28th at 11:59 pm CST. Enter code GIVETHANKS16 in the promo code box at checkout.

The details on this years Give Thanks Sale are as follows…
-Sale includes both digital and printed patterns.
-The sale EXCLUDES wholesale orders, gift cards, the Stowe Bag, the printed Farrow, and the printed Tamarack.
-Enter the code GIVETHANKS16 at checkout for 20% off your purchase.
-You will enter the discount code on the first page of the checkout process along with your payment information.
-The sale ends at 11:59 CST on Monday November, 28th. No exceptions

That’s all you need to know. We hope you enjoy your Thanksgiving festivities!

Thank you!

 

Leave a comment Posted in News
Tamarack Jacket

Tamarack: Assembling your Quilted Pieces

Lets talk about quilting your Tamarack Jacket. For a lot of garment sewers this is going to be the most foreign part of the process unless you have some quilting experience. Fear not, we’ll walk you through with ease and soon you’ll be wanting to quilt all sorts of things! If you have questions about cutting or any of the supplies used here, please see our previous two posts, Tamarack Supply List and Cutting your Jacket.

Quilting your Tamaracka Jacket | Grainline Studio

To begin, you’ll want to create your “quilt sandwich” which is exactly what it sounds like. The two outer layers, in this case the shell and lining, form the bread and the batting becomes the sandwich innards. Align the three layers of fabric so that they’re smooth with no bunching or ripples, and so that all edges match up.

Quilting your Tamaracka Jacket | Grainline Studio

Pin around the edges to temporarily secure the jacket layers. Using thread, stitch two small tacks to mark the pocket placement. You don’t want to mark these with chalk because it will likely wear off as you quilt your layers.

Quilting your Tamaracka Jacket | Grainline Studio

Next I like to hand baste two anchor lines through the jacket. I use these as another matching point to make sure things are aligned while drawing my final quilting lines. Draw a line with chalk parallel to the front of the jacket about 5-6″ in.

Quilting your Tamaracka Jacket | Grainline Studio

Using your basting needle (or whatever needle you have on hand) baste along the chalk line you just drew.

Quilting your Tamaracka Jacket | Grainline Studio

Mark and stitch another line perpendicular to the center front. I like to stitch mine so that it meets the intersection point of the armscye and side seam, that way I can easily make sure my quilting matches from piece to piece.

Quilting your Tamaracka Jacket | Grainline Studio

Now we’re all prepped to quilt our Tamarack pieces, but before you dive right in I highly recommend testing out a few different thread colors, stitch lengths, and quilting patterns on a scrap. Make sure you’re testing on the same three layers you’re making your jacket from as the thickness can affect how the stitching appears. You’d hate to test on a single layer, nail down something you love, then find it doesn’t transfer the same way to the layered fabrics. We have a great post where we illustrate a few different quilting designs here. If you’re having a hard time deciding how to quilt your jacket definitely check it out!

Quilting your Tamaracka Jacket | Grainline Studio

Once you’ve got your stitch pattern decided on it’s time to mark your pieces and stitch. As when quilting a quilt, you’ll want to start in the middle and work outward. I only mark a few lines at a time as the movement of the machine and your hands maneuvering it under the foot can wear away the outer lines if you’ve drawn them all in right away. Once you draw your lines, use your safety pins to pin baste around the stitching lines. This helps to further ensure the fabric stays where it is as you work. Stitch over the lines you traced using a walking foot if you have one available to you.

Quilting your Tamaracka Jacket | Grainline Studio

Quilting your Tamaracka Jacket | Grainline Studio

Remove the pins and continue the method above for the rest of the pattern piece as shown above.

Remove the pins and continue the method above for the rest of the pattern piece as shown above.

Stitch around the outer edge of the piece inside the 1/2″ seam allowance. I stitched at 1/4″ around all edges. This helps to anchor the piece and makes it so that when you’re sewing your quilted pieces together to make the jacket you’re not dealing with 6 loose layers. Once you’ve gone around the piece, remove your basting stitches.

Repeat these steps for each pattern piece in the jacket, then you’re ready for your welt pockets!

1 Comment Posted in Tamarack Jacket
Tamarack Jacket

Tamarack: Cutting your Jacket

The Tamarack doesn’t have a lot of pieces, but you do cut a lot of the few there are. Because of that we wanted to do a quick post running through everything you’ll need to cut.

Cutting your Tamarack Jacket | Grainline Studio

Shell: You’ll need 2 fronts, 1 back, and 2 sleeves for the shell of your jacket. If you’re using pre-quilted fabric you will not need to cut any additional body pieces.

Cutting your Tamarack Jacket | Grainline Studio

Lining: To line the jacket you’ll need an additional 2 fronts, 1 back, and 2 sleeves. In this example we’re using different fabrics for the shell and lining, but if you’re using the same fabric for both layers just cut another set of pieces.

Cutting your Tamarack Jacket | Grainline Studio

Pockets: You’ll need 2 upper pockets, 2 lower pockets, 2 welts, and 2 welt interfacing pieces to complete your Tamarack. For our example we cut our pocket pieces from the lining fabric since they’ll be on the inside of the coat. Our welts we cut from the shell fabric since they’ll be out the outside of the coat.

Cutting your Tamarack Jacket | Grainline Studio

Batting: For the batting you can do one of two things. First, you can lay your pattern pieces onto the batting and cut just like you would for any other pattern piece. What I usually do is lay the shell onto the batting and cut around it. The reason I like to do this is that I can make sure that the batting is exactly the same size as the shell pieces. Occasionally things shift while cutting and this way I know exactly what I’m getting.

Bias Binding: If you’re making your own bias binding you’ll also need to cut that. I’m not going to cover that now since we have a whole post dedicated to binding the jacket. The only thing you’ll need to take into account now is if you’re using your shell fabric for the binding you’ll want to reserve about a half yard for that.

I’d planned on talking about quilting your pieces in the same post but to avoid things getting too long and to keep this in easily digestible chunks that’s it for today!

2 Comments Posted in Tamarack Jacket