Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Today is the final post in the Cascade Sew-Along, save for some variations I have planned that will pop up in the next few weeks, and we’re going to be sewing the lining into the coat. We will be doing this using the “bagged” method which requires little to no hand stitching. This method seems kind of crazy when you’re first reading through it but it definitely works, and works well! If you feel like you need more guidance, I have a Bagged Jacket Lining tutorial on the blog already, sometimes seeing things written out and photographed more than once can help clear out confusion, so you may want to check that out as well. And with that, lets get started!

https://www.grainlinestudio.com/2012/01/09/sewing-tutorial-how-to-bag-a-jacket-lining/

Begin by laying the coat shell out face up and the coat lining face down on top of it.

https://www.grainlinestudio.com/2012/01/09/sewing-tutorial-how-to-bag-a-jacket-lining/

Pin around the edges of the facings only, do not do anything with the lining yet.

https://www.grainlinestudio.com/2012/01/09/sewing-tutorial-how-to-bag-a-jacket-lining/

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Stitch around the bottom, sides, and neckline of where the coat and facings meet. You may want to turn your coat right side out at this point to double check that everything has been sewn at the right place before we seal up the coat in the next step. If you need to make any adjustments to the stitching, do that now.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Now align the hems of the lining and facing, fold back the seam allowance where the lining and facing meets. The sleeves will be tucked up inside of the body. It will seem like the lining is too short to meet the facing but don’t worry about that, this is what will create the pleat when the coat is turned.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Stitch along the bottom of the hem. Clip your corners and grade the seam allowances along the seams that are sewn to the facing. You do not need to clip or grade anything related to the hem of the lining or hem facing.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Now lay your coat out in a similar fashion. We’ll be attaching the sleeve facing and lining together in these next steps. I promise you’ll be able to get your jacket right side out after this no matter how strange this may seem.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Fold the cuff of the sleeve lining up about 2″.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Insert the folded lining cuff into the sleeve of the coat. You’ll want to make sure that the sleeves aren’t twisted and you have the correct seams matching each other.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

The front and back underarm seams should be matching.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Stitch around the cuff at the standard 1/2″ seam allowance. I’ve found this is the easiest setup to do so at my machine.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Your cuff now looks like this. Repeat the previous steps for the other sleeve.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

After both sleeves are connected at the cuffs, find the hole you left in one of the seams of the sleeve. If you left it open you’re good, if you basted it shut like I did to get a sharp seam press, then open the basting now.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

You will now begin slowly pulling the entire coat out that hole. Work slowly a little bit at a time and your coat will come through just fine. This Pendleton wool is SUPER thick and it worked with no trouble.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

You now have a coat that looks something like this. Pull the sleeves out and head over to your ironing board and begin gently pressing along the outer seam line to give the edges of your jacket a sharp press.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Despite the fact that none of these seams are on a curve, I find it easiest to press on the wool side of the ham because it holds the steam in longer to give a sharper press.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Once your coat is pressed, find the hole you made in the sleeve (we haven’t sewn it up yet) and run your hand through it to grab the side seams of both the lining and shell of the opposite side from the sleeve you have the hole in.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Bring the both out through the sleeve hole so that they’re visible and aligned next to one another.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

We will now create a thread chain between the two points to reduce lining slippage at the underarm. You won’t have to worry about the lining slipping far into or out of the sleeve when putting on and removing your coat. Once you’ve done that side, repeat for the other underarm.

 

The above is a small video illustrating how to make a thread chain. Apologies for the heater going on in the background, I unfortunately don’t have control over that.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Once both of your thread chains are in, you can sew up the hole in the sleeve one of two ways. You could do it by hand, or run over to your machine and stitch close to the edge. I usually use the machine method but either works equally well.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Once the hole is sewn up your last step is to stitch shut the small opening in the bottom of the jacket. Align and press everything as shown above and hand stitch in place.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

And congratulations!! You’ve just sewn the Cascade Duffle Coat!! I’m super proud of you and it really wasn’t that hard at all was it! It’s supposed to warm up a bit around here this weekend so I should be able to get some better photos of the finished coats for next week. I can’t believe it but it’s actually been too cold to wear any of my Cascades recently. I hope you enjoyed the sew along and learned a thing or two. Can’t wait to see your finished coats! If you’re on social media consider tagging me (@grainlinestudio) or using the #CascadeDuffleCoat or #CascadeSewAlong hashtags so I can check out what you’re up to with them!

 

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
This entry was posted in Cascade Sew Along. Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat

  1. hannah says:

    Hey, I’ve taken a look at both tutorials, and I can’t seem to wrap my head around how the hem stays in place if there’s a pleat at the bottom of the lining (as in, there’s nothing pulling it up/anchoring it to the body and ensuring it doesn’t roll to the outside). I’m working on something similar in leather, and I’m planning to use this method to line it, however I’m not sure how to guarantee that the hem stays in place without having visible top stitching on the front of the jacket (especially since leather doesn’t quite press the same way). Thanks for posting photos of this process twice, it’s really helpful!

  2. That coat is amazing, I love how you’ve used the pattern. I hope you get to keep this one.

  3. Jane says:

    Thanks for such a comprehensive sewalong as well as the great written instructions. I’m just sitting down for the first time in my completed Cascade. My first ever fully-lined jacket, I’m so chuffed!

  4. maia says:

    I can’t find instructions for where I should have left a seam in the sleeve open! does it matter where on the sleeve? it’s in one sleeve lining right?

    • Jen says:

      Doesn’t matter where it goes, I actually like to sew everything shut, then seam rip the hole open so that there’s a clearly pressed line where you will sew it back together. I usually put my hole near the elbow so that it’s hidden when you look at the lining through the cuff and the armhole.

  5. Gillian BC says:

    I don’t understand how the lining above the hemline and doesn’t fall down below the edge of the jacket. On the sleeves, you turned the lining up 2″ so that it was shorter than the outer sleeves and therefore pulls the outer around inside. For the body lining, you didn’t do that so is the lining shorter than the jacket outer pieces?

    • Jen says:

      The hems for the sleeves and body are treated in the exact same way. Since the lining is the same length as the coat, and there’s a facing, when you turn the facing up the lining becomes shorter than the jacket because it creates a pleat in the lining. The sleeve lining was only turned up so that it could be attached using the bagged method but the end result of both hems is the same.

  6. Nina says:

    Bit late to the party here… I can’t find anything in the sew-along about Step 52 – understitching the “center front edge” (almost the only step with no diagram!). I’m understitching the facings in the front, next to where they join the front bands, but I can’t get right to the ends because the corners are sewn already. Am I stitching in the wrong place??

Leave a Reply