Archer Sew Along | Day 10 | Sleeves and Side Seams

Archer Sew Along | Day 10 | Sleeves and Side Seams

This is a relaxing sew along day, we’re setting our sleeves and sewing our side seams – no big deal. Start by placing two lines of basting along the sleeve cap between the front and back notches. I like to place one line at 3/8″ and another at 5/8″ that way your stitching line falls between the two lines of basting.

Archer Sew Along | Day 10 | Sleeves and Side Seams

Archer Sew Along | Day 10 | Sleeves and Side Seams

Pin the sleeve to the shirt with right sides facing. Ease the sleeve cap between the front and back notches and stitch sleeve in place. Finish your edges as desired. I serged mine but you could zig zag, pink, or french seam if you’re using a lightweight fabric or silk.

Archer Sew Along | Day 10 | Sleeves and Side Seams

Archer Sew Along | Day 10 | Sleeves and Side Seams

Match the side seams with right sides facing, the seam of the sleeve should face away from the garment towards the cuff of the sleeve. Stitch and finish seams in the same method you used above. Press side seams to the back of the garment.

The following instructions on topstitching the side seams is completely optional and gives the look of a flat felled seam. This is done on a lot of menswear shirts + a high percentage of ready to wear shirts I’ve seen. I don’t do this on silk or if I french seamed my side seams but for this chambray it’s a yes.

Archer Sew Along | Day 10 | Sleeves and Side Seams

Start by turning the garment inside out. It will be easier to stitch through the length of the sleeve this way, I promise.

Archer Sew Along | Day 10 | Sleeves and Side Seams

Archer Sew Along | Day 10 | Sleeves and Side Seams

Then just start stitching at the hem, I stitch 1/4″ from the seam line, and continue till you reach the cuff edge of the sleeve. Once you get into the sleeve you’re going to have a lot of extra fabric pooling up that will be pretty awkward. Don’t worry about it, just keep piling it up behind the foot as shown above and keep going. Repeat for the other side.

That’s that on the sleeves and side seams. Tomorrow we’ll be making and attaching the collars. It’s a bit of a long post but it will be easier to follow if I include it all in one post. Get ready!

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12 Responses to Archer Sew Along | Day 10 | Sleeves and Side Seams

  1. sewexhausted says:

    I am SO caught up now! Between last night and just now… WHEW… So happy I joined you… ~Laurie

  2. sewamysew says:

    Hi Jen, general question- is there a particular reason that you chose a 1/2″ seam allowance for your patterns?

  3. evie says:

    love this series – i know i’ll be back when i get out the sewing machine again. i have your scout tee pattern and love it. but my clothing sewing skills always get a bit rusty because i don’t sew clothes as often as i’d like : ) getting sleeves in without puckering is one of my challenges! again thanks for your work and sharing your knowledge x

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  6. Katherine says:

    How do you suggest putting a French seam on the sleeve seam? I would imagine it would be pretty tricky to do just right… Especially with a 1/2 inch seam allowance rather than a 5/8″….
    Any suggestions? I don’t have a serger and I don’t like the unfinished look my machine gives it’s zig zags over an edge. French seams seem to be the best choice.

    • Jen says:

      You can totally french seam with a 1/2″ seam allowance, I do it with 1/4″ on fine or sheer fabrics all the time. The trick with french seaming a sleeve is that you’ll want it to be a sleeve with a relatively flat sleeve cap, otherwise the curve will likely be to great for it to work properly and you’ll end up with some pulling.

  7. Two years later…! The sew-along is so helpful. I am doing my very first shirt and it is the archer shirt !
    Thanks Jen !

  8. I am new to sewing garments (quilting was my gateway) and I was wondering why you add the basting stitches to the sleeve? To help prevent puckering?

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